Black History December 6th

blackhistory

* Today in Black History – December 6 *

1806 – The African Meeting House is established in Boston,
Massachusetts and will become the oldest African
American house of worship still standing in the United
States. This house of worship will be constructed
almost entirely by African American laborers and
craftsmen, but funds will be contributed by the white
community. Because of the leadership role its
congregation takes in the early struggle for civil
rights, the African Meeting House will become known as
the Abolition Church and Black Faneuil Hall. Frederick
Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison will be speakers
there.

1849 – Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryland. She
will return to the South nineteen times and bring out
more than three hundred slaves.

1865 – Ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, abolishing slavery is completed. The
proclamation of its acceptance will take place on
December 18, 1865.

1869 – The National Black labor convention meets in Washington,
DC.

1870 – Joseph H Rainey becomes the first African American in
the House of Representatives. He is a congressman from
the state of South Carolina.

1871 – P.B.S. Pinchback is elected president pro tem of the
Louisiana Senate and acting lieutenant governor. He is
the first African American to serve in these positions
in state government.

1875 – The Forty-Fourth Congress of 1875-1877 convenes with a
high of eight African Americans taking office. They are
Senator Blanche K. Bruce of Mississippi and congressmen
Jeremiah Haralson of Alabama, Josiah T. Walls of Florida,
John Roy Lynch of Mississippi, John A. Hyman of North
Carolina, Charles E. Nash of Louisiana,; and Joseph H.
Rainey and Robert Smalls of South Carolina.

1892 – Theodore K. Lawless is born in Thibodeaux, Louisiana. He
will receive his medical degree from Northwestern
University, hold a fellowship at Massachusetts General
Hospital and receive further training at the University
of Paris’s premier Dermatology program. He will become a
dermatologist, medical researcher, and philanthropist.
He will known for his work related to leprosy and
syphilis. He will also be involved in various charitable
causes including Jewish causes. He will create the
Lawless Department of Dermatology in Beilison Hospital,
Tel-Aviv, Israel, the T. K. Lawless Student Summer
Program at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot,
Israel; the Lawless Clinical and Research Laboratory in
Dermatology of the Hebrew Medical School, Jerusalem;
Roosevelt University’s Chemical Laboratory and Lecture
Auditorium, Chicago; and Lawless Memorial Chapel,
Dillard University, New Orleans. His philantrophy in
Israel was in gratitude for the support received from
Jewish doctors in obtaining his appointment to his
position at the University of Paris. A shrewd investor
and businessman, he will have a remarkable business
career. He will be director of both the Supreme Life
Insurance Company and Marina City Bank. He will also be
a charter member, associate founder, and president of
Service Federal Savings and Loan in Chicago. He will
become a self-made millionaire. He will join the
ancestors in Chicago, Illinois on May 1, 1971.

1949 – Blues legend Huddie “Leadbelly” Ledbetter joins the
ancestors in New York City.

1956 – Nelson Mandela and 156 others are jailed for political
activities in South Africa.

1960 – 500 store owners sign pledges of nondiscrimination in
Tucson, Arizona.

1961 – Dr. Frantz O. Fanon, noted author of “Black Skins, White
Masks” and “Wretched of the Earth”, joins the ancestors
in Washington, DC. He succumbs to leukemia at the
National Institutes of Health.

1977 – South Africa grants Bophuthatswana its independence.
The constitution, in effect after South Africa’s first
all-race elections in April 1994, will abolish this
black homeland, which will be reabsorbed into South
Africa.

______________________________________________________________
Munirah Chronicle is edited by Mr. Rene’ A. Perry
“The TRUTH shall make you free”

Today in Black History – June 28th

Joseph Cinque  aka Sengbe Pieh
AMISTAD

June 28, 1839

Joseph Cinqué (c. 1814 – c. 1879) formerly known as Sengbe Pieh, from West Africa – Sierra Leone was captured and enslaved with others illegally by slave traders in 1839.  At the time of his capture, Joseph had a wife and 3 children.

Cinque was sold to a Portuguese slave trader who sold him in Cuba to 2 Spaniards.  The 2 Spaniards had plan to sell Cinque and 110 others to sugar plantations in Cuba.  Instead, Cinque lead a revolt on board the ship Amistad to force them to take them back to Sierra Leone. For two months, they were at sea and eventually the US coast guard boarded and charged the slaves with mutiny and murder.

Ciinque and the other slaves were tried and the decision was made in their favor.  Later, the case was appealed to the Supreme Court and in March 1840, the Supreme Court ruled that the Africans mutinied to regain their freedom after being kidnapped and sold illegally.

Happy Birthday Muddy Waters

Muddy Waters

 

McKinley Morganfield was born, April 4, 1915, in a small town in Issaquena County, Mississippi.  This is the smallest populous county east of the Mississippi River with census count as of 2010 at 1,406 people. He grew up on the Stovall Plantation sharecropping.  Morganfield got his nickname “Muddy Waters” from playing in the mud puddles by the Mississippi River.  He started with the harmonica at 5 years.  By the time he was 17 years old he was playing the harmonica and guitar.

In1941 Morganfield was discovered by Alan Lomax and another music archivist from the Library of Congress, traveling the back roads of Mississippi looking for the legendary Robert Johnson.  They recorded two of Morganfield’s songs and lit a fire in the ambitious young man.  He will leave Mississippi for Chicago two years later to become a blues singer better known as “Muddy Waters.” He will join the ancestors on April 30, 1983 in Chicago,
Illinois.

 

Special Thanks: Munirah Chronicle

 

Black History February 22 Black Postmaster Lynching

mrsfrazerbaker

This is the story of 40 year old Frazier Baker, a school teacher that was appointed postmaster of Lake City, SC who was lynched.  The federal government appointed Blacks in certain areas of the south as postmasters as part of the reconstruction period.  Unfortunately, this did not please the local whites.  White folks were so outraged; a white mob attacked Frazier and his wife and kids.  On February 22, 1898 Frazier and a daughter was killed.  His wife Julia and another child was wounded and barely escaped.

A white South Carolina senator made the statement that the fine white people of Lake City refused to receive their mail from a “nigger.”  So, those fine white folks at 1am decided to set the post office on fire that also was where Frazier and wife and children called home.  Frazier was unsuccessful when he tried to put out the fire and when they opened the door the white mob fired at them.  His wife Julia was holding their 2 year old in her arms when the child was shot and killed.  He was so furious that he swung the door open and died from a hail of bullets.  The rest of the family took flight and hide in bushes until the fire died down and the gun shots stopped.

Julia and the children who escaped went to a neighbor for help.  One daughter had been shot in the arm and Julia was wounded by the same bullet that killed her 2 year old daughter.  They went untreated for days.  The news of this lynching was received with condemnation.  Ida B Wells-Barnett argued that this lynching is a federal matter because Frazier was appointed to postmaster by President McKinley.  Federal government investigated and tried those involved but the all-white jury deadlocked and a mistrial was declared and the men were never tried again.

The men who were tried for the lynching and murder of the Bakers is listed below:

Alonza Rogers

Charles D. Joyner

Edwin Rogers

Ezra McKnight

Henry Goodwin

Henry Stokes

Marion Clark

Martin Ward

Moultrie Epps

Oscar Kelly

W. A. Webster

 

Charles Lenox Remond

Orator, Activist, and Abolitionist

 

remond

February 1, 1810 – Charles Lenox Remond is born in Salem, Massachusetts to free parents.  He will become one of the most prominent of the African American abolitionist crusaders. Charles Remond will begin his activism in opposition to slavery while in his twenties as an orator speaking at public gatherings and conferences in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Maine, New York and Pennsylvania. In 1838 the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, will choose him as one of its agents. As a delegate  from the American Anti-Slavery Society, he will go with William  Lloyd Garrison to the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention in London  in 1840. He will have a reputation as an eloquent lecturer and  reported to be the first Black public speaker on abolition. He will recruit Black soldiers in Massachusetts for the Union  Army during the Civil War, particularly for the famed 54th and  55th Massachusetts Infantry. He will also be active in recruiting  for the U.S. Colored Troops. After the Civil War ends, he will  work as a clerk in the Boston Customs House, and as a street lamp inspector. He will later purchase a farm in South Reading (now  Wakefield), Massachusetts. He will join the ancestors on December 22, 1873.

 

Richard Nathaniel Wright

 

 

richardwright

 

One of our great writer and poet, Richard Wright was born September 4, 1908 in Roxie Mississippi.  Richard migrated to Chicago and after several jobs ended up with the Federal Writers Project in 1935 and shortly thereafter became famous for Uncle Tom’s Children.  Richard received praises and one critic said: “Uncle Tom’s Children has its full share of violence and brutality; violent deaths occur in three stories and the mob goes to work in all four. Violence has long been an important element in fiction about Negroes, just as it is in their life. But where Julia Peterkin in her pastorals and Roark Bradford in his levee farces show violence to be the reaction of primitives unadjusted to modern civilization, Richard Wright shows it as the way in which civilization keeps the Negro in his place. And he knows what he is writing about.” He earned a $500 prize from Story magazine for Uncle Tom’s Children.

In 1939 Richard got a Guggenheim Fellowship that allowed him to quit the Writers Project and finish Native Son the 1940 best seller. Richard moved to New York where he was told he had a better chance of being published. Then, Richard wrote an autobiography Black Boy in 1945.  He was part of the Harlem Renaissance.  And, for a short time was a Communist.  When he resigned from the Communist party he wrote an article titled “I tried to be Communist?”  Even though, Zora Neal Hurston and others criticism of hatred and racism in his writings labelling them violent did not prevent him from becoming successful.

Some African American artist and writers during Richard’s time left America disappointed with the lack of opportunities and Jim Crow racism for Paris.  Richard visited Paris in 1946 and came home and moved his family to Paris.  He was married to Ellen who was white. He never came back.  Wright died in Paris, France, on November 28, 1960.